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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 6,983 (some duplicates have been removed)
basis as the u.s. military is doing -- >> let me as this question a different way. >> we don't know -- >> workplace violence or a domestic terrorist. >> i've heard that, both of those characterizations. and we reef use to reach a find on that. and i have to say the reason is that we don't have the evidence sufficient to know, we don't know what kind of standard department of defense is applying certainly in their investigation was not into department of defense activities. it was not into the criminal investigation itself, which was to a great degree hands off to is because the military is pursuing a criminal case against major hasan. so we were unable to reach a decision on those issues. we do believe, and really would like to see justice done for the victims, their families. >> professor manji? >> domestic terrorism, home-grown. >> mr. leiter? >> congressman, the analysts within the week as i said dean to it to qualify as an act of international terrorism under the statute we used. it was a sub government of group, political violence called terrorism than. i call it terrorism toda
? let me give you one example, governor. manufacturing jobs last month dropped by 15,000. last night we heard president obama promise a million manufacturing jobs to cut the deficit and turn the economy around. are those promises the ones that paul ryan is talking about, the broken promises, and let me ask you, i guess, just point blank, are these promises running up against the reality of a still weak economy? >> well, the reality is there's always ups and downs in a recovery, but for the last couple of years we've seen the greatest expansion of manufacturing jobs that our country has been able to achieve since the 1990s. and as we move forward, especially as we become more energy independent, i think you're going to see more manufacturing jobs created in our country as this recovery continues to move forward. so, look, the most important job we create is the next job. the president understands that. that's why every decision he makes is based on what is best to move our economy forward. and that's what this election is about. look, nobody out there believes for a second that we've rec
the forces that may enact on it, all balanced out. let me show you how this thing looks. here's a cylinder like that. now there's no force this way, no force this way. but there is a force down and that's the force of gravity. and that force of gravity acting straight down right toward the center of the world, okay, that's its weight. if that were the only force acting, newton says, "hey, in the presence of a force, it will change how it's moving." it'll start to move, but it doesn't. that means there must be something pushing which way again? - up. - up. and what's pushing up on that? - the table. - it turns the table out. it turns out the table. the table is holding it up. and guess how hard the table's holding it up with just as much force as this is pulling down with. and, so the two forces cancel out. see. if i push on this thing over here with the force maybe of 10 newtons, and someone else pushes over here with 10 newtons. what's the net force on the object? oh, you can't do that. let me try this one then. let's suppose someone pushes over here with a force of 1 newton and someone e
to skip quickly and come back, let me quickly say to you -- as we were talking here about how depressing it is and is there any way out and i want to tell you that there is a way out. we can change the system. there are ways to change the system. we can make the government work, but it's going to take very fundamental changes and grassroots changes that are going to take the political system and turn it upside down. let me give you some examples of what i mean. either by the way, who is going to do that? you are going to do it. we have a system where when the people demand change, change will happen. if you don't change and you don't demand change -- it just won't. let me give you a couple examples of what began to dawn on me years ago. when i was in congress, i have the habit of having a lot of town meetings, neighborhood meetings with constituents like this. i might have half a dozen people there or i might have 200 people there. you would engage about the issues that are in front of the congress. and what you were thinking. in the book, in the acknowledgments, i didn't dedicate it to
. all those delegates opposed say no. >> in the opinion of the-- let me do that again. (laughter) >> jon: good idea. good idea. you should do that again. (laughter) because that first time, it didn't seem to work out for you. >> all of those delegates in favor say aye. >> aye! >> all those delegate os posed say no. >> no! >> i guess-- i will do that one more time. >> jon: what dow mean one more time what are you talking about? no means no. it is done. let it go. >> all those delegates in favor say aye. >> all those delegate os posed say no. >> no. >> in the opinion of the chair two-thirds of vote in the affirmative, the motion is adopted. >> what? >> it is sounding to me like the ayes and nea were very close but since passing the motion has been prescripted-- i can only say tie goes to the prompter. on the bright side we have finally discovered the evidence of democratic voter fraud republicans were always complaining about. there was only one man, one man who could rescue the day. the big dog! 42, mr. hillary rodham clinton! >> we are here to nominate a president. (cheers and applause)
is the evidence? >> this mattered piece of papyrus may look like a discarded business card. >> jon: let me interrupt you right there. (laughter) in what world does that look like a discarded business card? physicals it's a business card for an arc builder, maybe. but it really does look like a tattered piece of papyrus. you can't just say something in the voice over and expect to us go along with it in the off chance that our eyes are closed. it's really... sorry w what is the evidence. >> a harvard scholar has just revealed that a faded piece of papyrus written in the coptic language 400 years after jesus died contained the phrase, jesus said to them, my wife. >> that word, that phrase, jesus said, my wife, is cut off. (laughter) >> jon: wait, that's it? a piece of papyrus 400 years after the life of jesus that has the two words "my wife" and then just ends. that's your proof. well, let me see if i can fill that sentence out for you. jesus said my wife, if i ever find one, will really have to like thai food. or how about this. my wife, question mark, no, i'm not married. (laughter) what w
washington post." thank you both for being here tonight. >> it's great to be here. >> bob, let me start with you. you've been in the trenches on presidential campaigns. what is going on with the romney team right now? >> well, if it's as terrific of a campaign as they said, the word i might apply to it might be a terrible campaign. this goes back after a period of months, letting obama define him, the conventions, lack of any coherent narrative that could persuade people and now the fact that they are plafing on obama's turf, so, for example, the president has a huge lead on who fights for the middle class. >> right. >> romney is going to go out there and try to climb the steep side of the mountain and say he cares about the middle class. he's never defined an argument for himself. that's his campaign's fault but it's also his fault. it's the -- you know, last week's episode, if someone in that campaign drafted that statement, but he approved that statement. >> he's fighting the president's fight? >> yeah. he's fighting the president's fight in the middle class and last week on libya he
'm talking about, that we have these mental concepts that block out the flow of life. let me just quickly go through the eightfold path. yeah, just real quickly, we'll just blow right on through that, folks. but to give you some idea, first off, because the buddha has - you talked about a hosospital; dare we say a therapy? you got this illness because you're constantly thinking you're the center of the universe - well, here's the therapy. and it just cracks me up that this guy's putting all this out 2,500 years ago, and when we go through this, i'm just going to paint it in - i don't need to be sacrilegious, if we're even talking about a religion at this point - but to just paint it in a more pop way, because you can see the kinds of things he's saying - if we applied even a few of them, we would find our peace level and happiness level go up regardless of whether or not we happen to be a religious person. so just to go through them here, the eightfold path, first off, what we're talking about is the right path, the right way - the right state of mind. you have to have - and in one way, what
-- have to pay taxes in that country and not one single penny in american taxes. let me show you what that means. if we have that territorial tax, it will create 800,000 jobs, all of them in china, indonesia -- all of them abroad. so, folks, we are doing everything in our power to give incentives to companies to come home and stay home, not to create incentives for them to go abroad. [applause] one of the most fascinating statements governor romney made in his acceptance speech -- here is what he said -- one of the first things he would do as president, he would take a job store. with all of his tax policies, it will have to be a foreign trip. [cheers and applause] he will have to go abroad for his job is to work. president obama and governor romney have a different hue view as to the -- view as to how jobs are created. keeping jobs in america, really just to america -- that is the job of the american president. jobs in america. that is the job. [cheers and applause] as i look over at some of the people who are my age on my right now of the women -- on my right -- none of the women, b
's nothing there, other than their own will to finally do something about their addiction. >> let me just ask you as a follow-up, what do you say, then, that the only thing -- if you're saying that currently being charged with a felony is going to result in drug treatment or maybe a sentence that isn't going to send someone to state prison, what do you say to someone that says well, what do you do with the felony conviction? you're making a lot of felons out of people who are committing simple drug offenses. >> i think probably if you were to look at a lot of individuals who end up getting convicted of possession, the arrest charge was probably either possession for sales or sales case, and the individual took a deal for simple possession. i think that you still have the majority of those individuals who were incarcerated with state prison for possession either had strike priors, serious offenses, or they had pled down from a sales case. >> tal, let me ask you to respond to perhaps marty's point. you're a deputy public offender in san francisco and you've handled dozens of drug case, drug pos
board of trustees for san francisco. let me begin by thanking my good friend, someone who graduated from my alma mater, somebody who worked with for many years, he has been part of the elected city family for the city college for over a decade. of course, that is mr. marks. you want to give our condolences and certainly acknowledge milton's contribution to our college, not only to his family, community, to the environment that he terrorist so much, but also to the institution of our city college that he worked so hard to improve. he took up the mantle, especially in the hard times when it was challenging already. i had a chance to express that to abby last week and let her know that we were thinking about >> thank you and welcome everybody to today's announcement of my appointment to the city college board of trustees for san francisco. let me begin by thanking my good him, certainly, were blessed with the many years of service that he and the family provided. his contributions to our education community will be sorely missed, but for the generations to come forward for will provide, con
point. let me just hold for just one second so we get to the graphics, and then i want to come back because i want to do the roll-in because we've talked a bit about death here, and death is - after suffering and change, on our rites of passage, we come to death as a profoundly moving rite of passage that shakes you up, that shakes you from your standard limited sense of self. it demands that you see a bigger picture or you're literally crushed from within by grief and pain. i mean, i really - i think that having experienced death in many different forms from parents to friends to what have you, as we all do as we get older, i think the only way that i have overcome my grief is to transcend my limited sense of self, and on the other side of me, find an interconnection with the one who has gone on - that you have to come out of a simple ego-oriented bodily sense of self, and connect at some much more fundamental level, in order to get out of the grief part of it. but that's yet another story, and a difficult one. but on the note of death, let me bring in the role in here on egypt. we
the hall. let me simply say that president calderone, the yondah stuff five boies earned a bachelor's degree in the law and economics, and master's degree in public administration at the john kennedy school at harvard university. he became, a supporter of the party for the national action party becoming the president of the youthful organization and in the late 90's he became its president. before the 2006 election as president of mexico he served as a deputy in mexico's federal chamber of deputies and of the secretary of energy. and he will leave office in december remember as the president who built the most universities, 96. 16,000 kilometers of highways, the bridge that connects mexico's coast providing faster access and therefore more efficient trade. and the passage of the first employment act which provides incentives for the companies to hire people just entering the workforce. he also faced the daunting challenge of the violent spawn by the drug cartels that left 50,000 people dead. the poll taken this past august showed his approval rating of about 64%. we are so honored t
and i hold it like this. watch what happens? oh, it falls. that's strange. well, let me hold it like this. it still falls over. let me hold it like this. oh, it's okay. like this, it's okay. like this, it's okay. like this. oh, yacko. how come it topples? because the center of gravity is over here and underneath is nothing. there is no place of support. let's look at that. here's my l-shaped piece of wood. center of gravity is right here. that means all mother earth pulls down like this. just as if all the weight were concentrated there. but look, there's no support position down here. the last point of support is the corner. and you know what it does? it rotates around that corner. it's just as if i had a little fulcrum here. you people know what a fulcrum is? like in a see-saw, it's the part about which rotation occurs. usually a triangular shape in diagrams. the fulcrum. it's just as if there's a fulcrum there. and it rotates around that fulcrum. and when it does that, it gives rise to a twisting force. it twists. we don't say twisting force. we have another name for twisting forc
, say aye. all those delegates opposed, say no. in the opinion of the -- let me do that again... all of those delegates... in favor say aye. [yelling aye]. >> all those delegates opposed say no. [delegates yelling no] [grumbling from crowd]. >> i... i guess... >> you gotta let them do what they are going to do. >>il do that one more time. all those delegates in favor, say aye. [yelling aye]. >> all those delegates opposed say no. [yelling no]. >> in the opinion of the chair, two-thirds voted in the affirmative, the motion is adopt and thes laen amended as shown on the screen. >> sean: now, despite the fact that a clear majority didn't vote to approve the change, the los angeles mayor went ahead with it anyway. here's why, in his teleprompter, the script was already load, ordering him to declare that, quote nthe opinion of the chair, two-thirds having vote in the affirmative, we are going to continue all of this and continue the coverage here on "hannity." but first, let me welcome the reverend jesse jackson. >> good to see you. >> sean: this will be the convention that we will rememb
they don't give us the facts i think it's well within our rights to try to figure them out. let me give you two very good examples. so yesterday mitt romney says, no, i want to require insurers to cover pre-existing conditions. but we know he's going to repeal the affordable care act. if you take away the structure of the aca and mandates, what that means is that if you get sick, if you get really sick, you don't have to do any -- you just -- you don't have to have health insurance. you can hang out as much as you want, never pay an insurance premium. but as soon as you get really sick, you go to the health insurer and they have to insure you. this is a called a moral hazard in economics and it's a big market failure. it makes the whole system breakdown pretty quickly. same thing on the tax side. he said we're going to cut taxes 20% across the board. i'm not going to tell you how i'm going to fill in the revenue gap. when you try to fill in that gap, you find out that there are not enough loophole closures to make up the difference. >> let me deal with the loopholes. he will not be specific
. let me give you some examples of what i mean. by the way, who's going to do that? you are going to do that. change will happen. it began to dawn on me years ago. when i was in congress, i have a habit of having lot of town meetings, neighborhood meetings, meeting with constituents like this. and i might have half a dozen people there. i might have 200 people there. and he would engage about the issues that were in front of congress and what you were thinking. at one of those meetings, and actually in the book, the acknowledgments, i did not dedicated to this person that i could have. but i acknowledge this to that person and somebody stood up in my town meetings anyone know why they do not do this or that. someone who wants wants to know why they do not do this. i don't even remember what it was. but i did what politicians do. i said well, i tried. i introduced a bill. that the other party controlled congress. the other party decided whether or not you could get bills brought forward. they decided whether or not and the other party did it and somebody stood up in that room and said, i
and body language say "holy (bleep), we're all gonna die!" (laughter) let me give you a better example to illustrate the dichotomy between the message mitt romney is sending verbally and the message he's sending visually. ladies and gentlemen, i take you to a cruise ship somewhere in the north atlantic. (laughter) hey, ladies and gentlemen, it's me, your captain. i understand there's been some talk of ice on the star board side of the ship. (laughter) that's attracted some attention. (laughter) (cheers and applause) anyway, i-- i just want to take a moment to reassure everybody we have it under control. obviously we all look forward to reaching the other side of the ocean with everybody not in a watery grave. (laughter) this would be so much easier if i was latino. (laughter and applause) - [ background chatter ] - ♪ [ harp notes ] - i see a little silhouetto of a man. - scaramouche. scaramouche. will you do the fandango? oh. thunderbolt and lightning-- very, very frightening me. - galileo. - galileo. - galileo? - figaro. easy come, easy go. will you let me go? - bismillah, no. - [ t
] >> marty, let me ask you, you're obviously part of the california district attorney's association, as we were talking before the panel began, you shared with me that your organization has previously supported a measure that mark leno brought forward to lower the punishment for possession of less than an ounce of marijuana to a misdemeanor to an infraction. in this case your organization is essentially opposed to it. what do you say to mr. adelman and mr. gascon? >> i think one of the things i want to point out is that in terms of the changes currently taking place in california's criminal justice system is that we have embarked on a very, very large experiment and that's called realignment. prison population in california is going to approach by -- or sometime next year the federal mandate of 130,000. we've already released some 50,000 individuals to serve their time locally, and these offenses that we were talking about here are currently in the list of offenses that were to be served in county jails now. and if the notion here is to provide services and treatment to these individuals f
, or they had pled down from a sales case. >> tal, let me ask you to respond to perhaps marty's point. you're a deputy public offender in san francisco and you've handled dozens of drug case, drug possession cases, you've been -- a lot of people caught their attention when you were quoted in the press saying the way we handle drug enforcement here in california is in effect a war on crumbs instead of the often used phrase on drugs. how do you respond to his remarks? >> well, i think the first thing that we have to recognize is that the majority of people who are caught up in the criminal justice system and who are prosecuted for this type of offense for possession offenses and to some degree possession for sale offenses, the vast majority are indigent people and the vast majority of those indigent people are people of color. so what you have are two systems in place. you have a system where privileged white middle class people basically use drugs, college campuses, frat parties, not clubs, they use drug with impunity, they don't have to worry about being caught. then you have a system that
of change but if he would just let me, perhaps i could help him real estate range his thought process. so how about we put this game on pause instead of sneaking around like mice because we can focus on making an amazing display of something 35eusing, earth taking, something unfailing, smag maysing the but -- something amazing. but i can see it's impossible, unimaginable, and very unexplainable. i may not like it. i may hate it, hate it with every inch of movie body, with every atom that makes up my existence, every molecule, every cell in my system but life isn't like one big, bird and you can't always have things your way. before i say goodbye, there's this guy and when he smiles, everything just seems all right. [cheers and applause] >> up next is my girl lajenae. >> ok, well, my name -- the majority of people call me la. i wrote this poem this morning and it's dedicated to a couple of people in the audience right now. so -- never had someone like you. i understand you can only be you but does you include us? does you include the ones you are supposed to cherish? i remember those days
-- very, very frightening me. - galileo. - galileo. - galileo? - figaro. easy come, easy go. will you let me go? - bismillah, no. - [ together ] we will not let you go. - let me go. - we will not let you go! [ high operatic voice ] ♪ let me go ♪ [ rock ] (cheers and applause). >> jon: welcome back. now there is a great deal of talk in this country about people picking themselves up by their boot straops to better their lives and fight their way into the 1%. but is it worth the cost? jason jones has more. >> amongst all the terrible news about people who've lost their jobs or their homes there's been one group that's been overlooked-- the extremely wealthy. luckily, psychologist dr. steven goldberg and psychotherapist joan defuria has been there to help. >> average client is $25 and $50 million and up. people come to us when they don't have to work another day in their lives. >> so why do they have problems? (laughter) >> i know it sounds very odd but the climate today is very different than it was ten years ago. >> we're really angry at the haves right now. >> and so what happens beca
to address. before we start with attorney argument, let me take the role commissioner said the. commissioner of view. commissioner hayon. commissioner rennie. all commissioners are here. let's begin with the mayor. >> good morning, commissioners. i have prepared a closing argument in anticipation of not being interrupted, by understanding this change. we have a compressed amount of time. i will do my best to cover the main points and answer your questions as well. let me proceed. on march 19th, 2012, the city and county of san francisco and the sheriff's department faced an intolerable situation. its share of mercury had just been correct -- convicted of a crime and had just been sentenced to three years of preparation out of his four-year term in office. he was convicted of a fine -- a crime of false imprisonment what at the same time having the duty to lawfully imprisoned the prisoners at the county jail. moreover, it was a crime of domestic violence. it was a crime involving the relationship of trust in a marital relationship. any crime involving the violation of trust raises questions ab
my tax relief bill in' 912348 let me recite it to you from memory. we have full team coverage starting with span that bee at the convention center. sam bee. >> i'm not there yet. a lot of security in charlotte. (laughter) i'm still at a checkpoint on church and west 10th. i can't get through, charlotte police tell me access point has been switched to the corner of south church and east third so i guess i'm going to head there. (applause) >> sam, don't bother. >> pelley: jessica williams? >> i'm at south church and east third. you're not going to get through here, it's locked down. state police tell me access point has been switched. it's now sixth and davisson which coincidentally is where i was an hour ago when i was sent here! >> pelley: jessica, why are you both on foot. we sent you in cars. >> good luck, i ditched my mine four hours ago. >> jon? >> john. >> al madrigal, tell me you've gotten inside the perimeter. >> i'm very close to the convention center. the bad news is that my camera guy didn't get in. (laughter) i asked one of the cops how to get a camera through the c
're going to give him that chance in november. he's going outside. >> let me bring in josh marshall, editor and a senior political columnist. good morning. good to see you. josh, as the presidents like to say, admitting defeat, being honest? dissing congress, what was that about? >> saying something pretty straightforward. any president needs to mobilize people from the inside in the country to push legislation. i think this is a bit of a stretch for the romney campaign. they're having a hard time getting traction anywhere. they're trying with this. i don't think the sense that the people in chicago are losing a lot of sleep over it. >> in fact, here was david axelrod's take this morning. >> it's just one more example of how he's just cascading from one gratuitous attack to another, and instead of talking about solutions to the problems we face. >> is that, tim, a gratuitous attack we've been hearing from mitt romney, or are they thanking their lucky stars in fact and saying finally i don't have to talk about the 47% anymore? >> i do think romney would rather be talking about obama than abo
will make sure we do not report either of you. let me try this. you can leaves -- use the list. it have been charged -- you have been charged unjustly and you have one person to negotiate for you. who do you want? one person on this list to negotiate for you. you have been unjustly charged on something. who do you want? ? >> bill clinton. >> why do you what bill clinton? >> he can do it. >> he knows. he knows to compromise. >> he is so smooth and so smart now. >> he has modeled it himself. he can get you out of anything. >> i will take this as more of a -- look at the whole list here again. who is the one person you do not want to cross to have them angry at you? who is the one person you would say, i do not want that person angry at me. take a look. who is the one person i do not want on the other side angry at me? write it down. everybody right down somebody? what did you write down? >> michelle obama. >> harmony wrote down -- how many rode down michelle obama? half the group. why? >> her husband has got an army. >> she speaks with fire in her eyes. >> she would be a scary lady when she is
matthews in sunny philadelphia. let me start tonight with this rare moment when you get to look behind the curtain. remember in "the wizard of oz" when we saw the man actually doing the talking? well, this is the week we heard from the real oz, mitt romney, pay no attention to the man behind the curtain, we're told. but how can we ignore the real mitt when he says half the country he wants to run is filled with beggars, moochers, loafers, moochers, people who don't want to work, want the better off to give them breakfast in bed. he's the real willard who wants him to give him control of the country. and that's our topic tonight, the man behind the curtain who thinks compassionate conservative is yesterday's magic act and wants to crack down on the little people big time, at least that's the way he talks when he's fobbing for money down in tony boca raton. howard fineman is an msnbc correspondent. cynthia tucker is a syndicated columnist. first, brand new poll numbers nationally. let's check the "hardball scoreboard." new pew poll president obama over romney, among likely voters, 51% to
there. let me see. let me see. let me see. open up. - sir. - burn it. burn everything! - [screams] - sergeant strausser. what do you think you're doing? - [moaning] - i was interrogating the suspect, sir. - not like this. we're not animals. sir, are you all right? i'm sebastian monroe. president of the republic and general of its militia. - i know who you are. - look, i am sorry. it's okay. it's okay. but you do know why you're here. i need to know where the other rebels are. now, you tell me, you'll be with your family inside a week. i guarantee you. look, you rebels are bombing my camps. you're killing my men. you're terrorists. but hasn't there been enough violence? don't people have the right to be safe? happy? - people aren't happy. they're scared to death of you. but i'm not. no, no, no. [grunts] - you know, it was probably all my fault. yeah. it was, i blame myself. - we made it out okay. - mm, yeah. that went like clockwork. - swiss army knife, please. aaron? - what's this? - just-- - what are you doing with an iphone? - swiss army, please. - charlie, next time i tell you
. >> let me ask you about your life since 1975 first. when did you come to the united states? under what circumstances? >> i came first to. why? i stay as a refugee, like other vietnamese refugees. i stayed in camp pendleton for two months. >> california. >> yeah, in california. and then after that, i joined my family here in fair tax, virginia. so we live here for one year. and then one day i was invited by television, you know, showdown l.a., los angeles. so while in l.a., i met with some vietnamese friend. and then they convinced me that california have a better climate and whatever for me. so we decide to move down there in 1 1976. >> where do you live? >> well, we move around. first, we bought a house in huntington beach. with the money i make from the book. and from the speaking tour. i remember it was only $110,000 at that time, four-bedroom, nice house. i only had to put 10%, $12,000. and then i left huntington beach and then go to live in hong kong for almost three years. >> what years were those? >> 1988 to 1991. and then when i come back to america, we go to seattle for one ye
. but let me be clear. there is no justification for this. none. violence like this is no way to honor religion or faith. as long as there are those who would take innocent life in the name of god, the world would never know a true and lasting peace. it is especially difficult that this happened on september 11th. it's an anniversary that means a great deal to all americans. every year on that day we are reminded that our work is not yet finished, the job of putting an end to violent extremism and building a safe and stable world continues. but september 11th means even more than that. it's a day on which we remember thousands of american heroes. the bonds that connect all americans wherever we are on this earth, and the values that see us through every storm. and now it's a day on which we will remember sean, chris and their colleagues. may god bless them and may god bless the thousands of americans working in every corner of the world who make this country the greatest force for peace, prosperity, and progress, and a force that has always stood for human dignity, the greatest force t
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 6,983 (some duplicates have been removed)